Scaling up treatment in resource-constrained settings: What will it take to achieve the last 90?
Gloria Maimela, South Africa

Stem cell and genome editing for HIV cure
Paula Cannon, United States

Implementation science around transgender issues
Asa Radix, United States

The role of microbiome in HIV transmission and pathogenesis
Adam Burgener, Canada

Barriers to access to diagnosis and treatment
Ingrid Bassett, United States

Key populations in Latin America: Young men who have sex with men
Carlos Fernando Caceres, Peru

Co-morbidities
Esteban Martínez, Spain

Sustainability of HIV programmes and financing the HIV response
Sherrie Kelly, Australia

Primary HIV infection: An opportunity not to be missed?
John Frater, United Kingdom

Session Description
This session will review the potential for achieving HIV epidemic control through expansion of HIV treatment and prevention, even with a partially effective HIV vaccine and highly effective PrEP. The objectives are to: articulate the targets for epidemic control; review the potential for various treatment and prevention technologies to work in concert to achieve this goal; review advances in HIV vaccine development; review the potential for HIV treatment programmes to reduce HIV incidence; and review non-HIV vaccine prevention advances.

Introduction

Achieving HIV control

The role of HIV vaccines in achieving HIV epidemic control

Achieving 90-90-90 – implications for HIV epidemic control

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
In this session, the speakers will address the importance of preventing and managing co-morbidities in controlling HIV and in healthy ageing. The session will examine data and highlight best practices, and the speakers will address ageing and frailty, as well as the most important co-morbidities, including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, renal disease and osteoporosis. The speakers will discuss the increasing importance of geriatric care for people living and ageing with HIV. Issues of polypharmacy and complications of ageing.

Introduction

Ageing and HIV – what is the epidemiology and the science?

Noncommunicable diseases among persons living with HIV

Risk and prevention of diabetes in PLWH

Questions and answers

Session Description
Achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets requires new and innovative ways of implementing programmes, particularly around gender-related issues. Programmes focused entirely on women and girls, in particular cis-women, are not taking into consideration women in all their diversity and nor are they exploring ways to sensitize men and boys. How can data-driven gender-transformative approaches strengthen HIV programming with and for women and girls in all their diversity, actively challenge gender norms and address power inequalities between different genders? Integrating gender-transformative approaches into implementation science studies will be critical for analysing innovations and identifying best practices in various settings. Join us for an interactive session that explores how to use study data and gender analysis to improve HIV programming, outlines strategies to integrate gender considerations in implementation science, and provides new evidence-based success stories from gender-transformative interventions.

Introduction

Gender-transformative approaches: How to make it meaningful

Discussion: How to test more men. Challenging notions of masculinity

Panel discussion: Do women in all their diversity really count? A tailored approach

Discussion: How to tackle gender-based violence. Changing systemic attitudes

Interview: What are the secrets to success? Exploring best practices from gender-transformative interventions

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will provide updates on efforts to further define and characterize sources of persistent HIV infection in both tissues and the periphery. It will also address the efficacy of approaches seeking to either induce deep latency as a modality to permanently prevent reactivation of HIV or induce HIV reactivation from reservoir sources as a mechanism to clear persistently infected cells. The objective is to examine new data on the dynamics of HIV reservoirs and to generate discussion towards assessing the feasibility of approaches aimed at achieving, at a minimum, a functional cure.

Introduction

HIV persistence in macrophages

Cellular reservoirs

Latency reversal

Block

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will review challenges to current HIV testing algorithms in the context of new and emerging PrEP products. Participants will also consider how vaccines or broadly neutralizing antibodies might influence HIV testing. They will examine the implications of false test results for clinical management and the potential for emergence of resistance. Participants will discuss the need for community engagement on this topic.

Introduction

HIV testing updates and challenges

HIV resistance in the context of PrEP

Considerations in the clinical management of PrEP users who test positive for HIV

Considerations for community messaging about HIV testing in the context of PrEP

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will focus on recent achievements in understanding the mechanisms driving natural control of HIV and how that applies to prevention (including vaccine development) and cure interventions. It will consider how information learned from elite and post-treatment controllers contributes towards strategies to prevent, treat and cure HIV infection.

Introduction

Post-treatment control

Long-term control in paediatric populations

Immunology of control

Mechanism of elite control

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will focus on recent insights into adaptive and innate immunity against HIV and their impact on the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. An objective is to combine in a single session several key players in innate (NK cells) and adaptive (B cells and T cells) immunity. The session will include presentations on the modulation of the function of these cells to achieve a functional cure for HIV infection.

Introduction

NK cells

T cells

HIV-specific T cells

CAR T cells

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will focus on recent developments in HIV molecular virology, including HIV entry, reverse transcription, integration, transcription, translation and budding. It will describe cellular and viral factors that enhance or inhibit HIV replication, and participants will discuss how these mechanisms can be harnessed to target viral replication and/or latency.

Introduction

Use of high-dimensional single-cell analysis to characterize cells latently infected with HIV

Serinc3/5

HUSH antagonism by lentiviral proteins

Molecular mechanisms shaping HIV proviral fate

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will review new biomedical HIV prevention products under development and examine data on their safety, pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Participants will review the rationale for new products under development and comment on end user engagement in the development of new products.

Introduction

Advances in the field of broadly neutralizing antibodies

Long-acting injectables for HIV prevention

Implants and transdermal drug delivery systems for HIV prevention

Topical and on-demand PrEP

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will review considerations for future HIV prevention trial design, including those that involve vulnerable populations, as the range of prevention options expands. Participants will look at regulatory perspectives on trial design and potential surrogate endpoints, and study perspectives and considerations for the standard of HIV prevention in trials.

Introduction

Regulatory perspective for streamlining HIV prevention trials

Novel vaccine trial designs

HIV prevention efficacy trial designs of the future

Considerations for the standard of prevention in an evolving HIV prevention landscape

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
There are many emerging global developments relating to: reduced funding for HIV; changes in global health priorities to focus on emerging non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and investments in systems driven by renewed calls for universal health coverage; and economic transitions of growth in many high-burden countries, which in turn impacts development assistance that currently heavily funds HIV and AIDS programmes. In this context, it has become increasingly important to rethink advocacy to sustain global and national attention in the HIV and AIDS agenda. This session aims to reflect on and determine the importance of political will in getting to zero new infections; draw lessons from past successes of the HIV response that catapulted it and maintained high-level political commitment for two decades; provoke discussions on how to maintain high levels of political will at a global level and within countries for HIV in the face of emerging transitions and competing priorities.


Introduction

Status neutral care approach in New York City

Fast Track Cities

100% Treatment - politics and resources

Question and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
While young people’s uptake of HIV testing and prevention programmes remains low, young people from key populations (men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people, people who inject drugs) face additional barriers. Due to stigma and lack of youth-friendly services, reaching them with HIV prevention and testing services is a pervasive challenge. To prevent new HIV infections and increase the number of these young people who know their status, innovative approaches, including social media and mobile apps, are being utilized to scale up access to HIV prevention and PrEP and increase testing rates. The objective of the session is to share best-practice examples of young key population-friendly prevention and testing programmes, sensitize service providers to young key population’s specific needs, and discuss ways to foster their engagement in research and programming.

Welcome & Introduction

Leaving no one behind: Young key populations in the HIV response

Engaging young MSM and transgender women in HIV prevention/PrEP

Overcoming barriers to HIV testing among young MSM and transgender women in Jamaica

Engaging young female sex workers in HIV testing in Malawi with mobile outreach clinics

Reaching young people who inject drugs with harm reduction services in Ukraine

Panel discussion

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will highlight the sexual and reproductive health (SRH) needs of people at risk of acquiring HIV, and will explore best practices in integrating appropriate HIV programming within SRH services. The session will examine data on prevalence and incidence of STIs in the context of PrEP and data on drug-drug interactions between hormones and PrEP and HIV risk. It will also provoke discussion on the safety of drugs in pregnancy and how to weigh risks.

Introduction

STIs in the era of PrEP

Understanding drug-drug interactions between exogenous hormones and PrEP

Contraception and HIV: Update on the evidence and implications for programmes

ART for prevention in women of childbearing age: Issues to consider

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

Session Description
This session will gather community representatives, basic scientists and clinicians involved in HIV cure research. It will present an overview of current efforts that have been undertaken towards finding a cure for HIV infection. The objective of the session is to foster discussion between the various groups involved in HIV cure research. It is expected that the session will help identify not only commonalities, but also discrepancies in the vision of HIV cure among these groups. Participants will also discuss and acceptable definition (and modality) of HIV cure and how this can be achieved.

Introduction

Community perspective

Translational work: Eradication from bench to bedside

Latency reversal in vivo

The use of animal models in cure studies

HIV cure by stem cell transplantation

Questions and answers

Closing remarks

IAS/Abivax Research-for-Cure Academy Fellowship Prize